what-language-is-spoken-in-brazil

What language is spoken in Brazil?

Brazil is responsible not only for a territory of South America, but also for a large part of the continent’s linguistics: but Portuguese is not the only language ​​spoken in Brazil!

Despite being the main language, in Brazil even Spanish and Japanese coexist along with Dutch, Roman dialect and other 274 indigenous languages ​​spoken by 305 ethnic groups, according to the 2010 census.

learn portuguese

With wealth and culture, it is not surprising that São Paulo, for example, a city with a greater number of Portuguese speakers, is also a house of speakers of Arabic, Italian, Chinese, Hebrew, among other languages.

What language does Brazil speak?

What language does brazil speak?

Portuguese. According to historical data, a Portuguese language first touched the Brazilian soil when Pedro Álvares Cabral arrived in Brazil in 1500.

The rest, as they say, is history. When Cabral arrived, there being 6 to 10 million years of living today, we call 1300 different languages. At present, the economy is only 170 000, speak 181 languages. In turn, missionaries may have studied the Tupi languages ​​of cost tribes, their main purpose being to exercise greater influence and control under the Indians. This was a continuation of a series of the indigenous languages ​​of the Marquis of Pombal in 1775.

Brazilian Portuguese is different from European thanks to the remnants of African and Amerindian languages. There are more than 205 million Portuguese speakers in Brazil, compared to 10 million in Portugal.

What is the official language of Brazil?

In any case, Portuguese is the official language of Brazil, the language that the government uses to communicate and the language in newspapers and schools. Even so, despite a medium not yet portrayed, Brazil has countless regional accents, and in some regions even dialects.

Find out the best way to learn Portuguese for free!

Curiosity: by law, the Brazilian Language of Signals – Libras – should always be free in their vehicles.

History of the Portuguese language in Brazil

History of the Portuguese language in Brazil
Disembarkation of Pedro Álvares Cabral in Porto Seguro in the year 1500. Oil on canvas by Oscar Pereira da Silva (1922).

Brazil was “discovered” by Portugal in the year 1500, and since then, with the great presence of the Portuguese in the Brazilian territories, the Portuguese language has taken root, while the indigenous languages ​​have gradually disappeared. One of them, perhaps the one that most influenced the current Portuguese spoken in Brazil, was Tupinambá or Tupi-guarani, spoken by the Indians who inhabited the coast. This language was first used as a general language in the colony, alongside Portuguese, because the Jesuit priests who came to catechize the Indians, studied and ended up spreading the language.

In the year of 1757 a Real Provision prohibited the use of the Tupi, this time, in which the Portuguese already supplanted this language, being him, the Portuguese, with the title of official language. In 1759 the Jesuits were expelled, and from then on the Portuguese language definitively became the official language of Brazil.

Brazilian portuguese: Indigenous and African heritage

Brazilian portuguese: Indigenous and African heritage

The Portuguese language, spoken in Brazil, nevertheless inherited a vast vocabulary of indigenous languages, especially as regards the denominations of fauna, flora, and other words related to nature – as it also happens with brazilian recipes.

The Portuguese brought many slaves captured in Africa to work in the Brazilian lands, and they came speaking several dialects, which contributed to the construction of our language. Much of what we have today was inherited from the African languages ​​as well as cultural items that came with the slaves and settled here.

In this way, the Portuguese language spoken in Brazil, was distancing itself from the Portuguese language spoken in Portugal, because while here the language received the influences of the Indians (natives) and of the African immigrants, in Portugal the language received French influence (mainly due to culture, education, etc., which was then prestigious in France.)

When the royal family came to Brazil between 1808 and 1821, the two languages ​​again “approached”, because due to the large number of Portuguese in the big cities, the language was again suffering their influence and resembling the language- mom.

Brazilian Portuguese was also influenced by Spanish, Dutch and other European countries that invaded Brazil after independence (1822). This explains why some differences in vocabulary and / or accent exist between some regions of Brazil.

With the influence of Romanticism (artistic-literary movement that happened at the beginning of the 19th century), the literature produced in Brazil intensified, and the Portuguese language spoken in Brazil was becoming more and more a new form, differentiating itself even more from the language Portuguese spoken in Portugal. Individualism and nationalism were awakened in the country through literature, in addition to the political reality that drove the country to distance itself and to differentiate even more from Portugal.

The normalization of language was as consecrated by the modernist movement (1922), which brought as criticism the excessive appreciation still given to European culture, and motivated the people to value their own language as “Brazilian.”

Recently we had an orthographic reform, implemented in 2009, based on an agreement made between the countries that have Portuguese as their official language, and some writing rules that differentiated the norm, were modified, leaving it unified. Orality, however, continues to maintain considerable distinctions.

Brazil and its many languages

Brazil and its many languages
Map of the co-official languages existing in Brazil.

In Brazil, one speaks Portuguese, right? Yes, this is the language spoken by most of the people who live here. However, speakers of indigenous languages, immigration, frontiers and signs live in our territory. Because of the relations between their speakers, these languages ​​are influenced and modified.

We are among the most linguistically diverse countries in the world. It is estimated that about 250 languages ​​are spoken in the country, including indigenous languages, immigration, signs and Afro-Brazilian communities.

According to the 2010 Demographic Census survey of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), 274 languages ​​are spoken by Indians from 305 different ethnic groups. However, this result was considered inflated to include names of ethnicities or even languages ​​that are no longer spoken. “We only have an estimate of the number of languages ​​spoken in Brazil. Regarding indigenous languages, Census data are larger than those that researchers often reproduce, which is around 180 indigenous languages. In addition, research shows that there are 56 languages ​​spoken by descendants of immigrants living in Brazil for at least three generations, “says Rosângela Morello, general coordinator of the Institute for Research and Development in Linguistic Policy (Ipol).

With so much diversity, Brazil has its linguistic peculiarities, since the languages ​​are historical objects and are always related to its speakers. The majority of the Brazilian population is monolingual, that is, it speaks only Portuguese, which is their mother tongue and also the lingua franca, official and national language of the country. However, it is not possible to say that we are a monolingual country, since we have multilingual scenarios, that is, population groups that speak different mother tongues, but are able to communicate in another language. There are also groups that, besides their mother tongue, use other languages ​​for communication, such as in São Gabriel da Cachoeira (AM), where speakers of four official languages ​​live together: Portuguese, Nheengatu, Toucan and Baniua.

“The three possibilities – monolingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism – are intertwined in Brazil, but we can say that Brazil is a multilingual country that includes spaces where there is multilingualism. In turn, the country has a single official and national language, which is the Portuguese language, “analyzes Eduardo Guimarães, professor of Semantics at the Department of Linguistics of the Institute of Language Studies (IEL) at the University of Campinas. that other languages ​​are spoken, but it is usually the Portuguese that always predominates in the language space of the cities. Language teaching mechanisms are decisive elements in the distribution and functioning of languages.

In Spite of the enormous linguistic diversity in Brazil, the relation of the speakers and their languages ​​is unequal in comparison to the Portuguese language. The dominant perception is that only one language is spoken here. Considering the importance of knowing this diversity and preserving so many languages ​​with high risk of disappearance, it was created, through Federal Decree 7.387 / 2010, establishing the National Inventory of Linguistic Diversity (INDL), an instrument for inserting languages ​​as a reference cultural heritage, administered by the Institute of National Historical and Artistic Heritage (Iphan).

“The population contingent that speaks other languages ​​is numerically little expressive in relation to the number of Portuguese speakers. This imbalance, especially of the indigenous languages ​​and the languages ​​of immigration, makes Portuguese a kind of threat to the preservation of these other languages, since Portuguese is the vehicle for communication excellence in all fields of our society. This leads to discouragement and the gradual abandonment of the use of mother tongues, “says Marcus Vinicius Carvalho Garcia, coordinator of INDL.

Hegemony x diversity

Hegemony x diversity
RUGENDAS, GUERRILHA, 1835

The history of the country shows that the imposition of the Portuguese language was adopted as a strategy of occupation and unification of a country with such an extensive territory. Even before the arrival of the Portuguese, Brazil was already a multilingual country. Estimates suggest that 1,175 languages ​​were spoken by Indians of different ethnic groups in the Brazilian territory in 1500. For more than two centuries, the most widely spoken language in Brazil was the general Tupi-based nheengatu language used for communication between indigenous, Portuguese and African countries. The Portuguese language was used by a small part of the population, linked to the colonial administration. In 1757, a decree of the Marquis of Pombal prohibited the general language.

“Without a doubt, the Portuguese colonization project had a fundamental effect, which was the production of a territorial unit. And this went through the implantation of Portuguese as an official and national language throughout the entire Brazilian territory, “says Professor Eduardo Guimarães.

Similar process occurred with the African languages. For nearly three centuries, more than 4 million Africans who spoke about 200 different languages, such as Yoruba, Ewe-fon and Kimbundu, were brought into slavery in Brazil. The dismantling of the social and family ties of these people was a strategy to prevent communication in their native languages ​​and, with this, to avoid acts of resistance to slavery. As a consequence, African languages ​​survived, albeit precariously, only in the religious rituals of African matrices and in rural remnant communities of quilombos such as Cafundo, located in Salto de Pirapora (SP).

Also, the immigration languages, spoken by European and Asian immigrants who came to Brazil from the end of the 19th century, were heavily repressed by Getulio Vargas’ nationalist policy during Estado Novo (1937-1945). This picture intensified during World War II (1939-1945), when Brazil stood against the Axis countries, made up of Germany, Italy and Japan. The Brazilian government banned German, Italian, Japanese – and even Polish and Ukrainians – speak their tongues.

“The politics of linguistic homogenization affected the linguistic variety of Brazil. People realized that they could not learn or speak a language other than Portuguese. As a consequence, the majority of the population is unaware of our enormous linguistic diversity, which can generate prejudice. Language is a promoter of bonds, identities, memories, affections and knowledge. It is through the language that the world is known and values ​​are transmitted. Today, we see indigenous groups that have lost their tongues struggling to reestablish them because they are part of their stories, “notes Rosângela.

Pomerano: only in Brazil

The Pomeranian was the official language of Pomerania, a region between present-day Germany and Poland. With the end of World War II, most of the territory of Pomerania was annexed by Poland and, as a consequence, the Pomeranian language practically disappeared in Europe. Brazil is the only country in the world where Pomeranians are still regularly spoken of because of the arrival of thousands of immigrants in the 19th century. Currently, the Pomeranian language is spoken in five Brazilian states: Espírito Santo, Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, Rondônia and Minas Gerais.

In Espírito Santo, where nearly half of the 300,000 Pomeranians live, the Pomeranian School Education Program (Proepo) was created in 2005, which serves municipal schools in five municipalities. The pedagogical project of the program values ​​the Pomeranian language as a factor of ethnic identity and preservation of culture, through oral and written language, dances, religion and other traditions, promoting the self-esteem of the language-speaking students. They are literate in Portuguese, but the Pomeranian is a discipline of the curriculum.

Libras: the Brazilian language of signs

The Brazilian language of signs (Libras) was recognized as the second official language of Brazil in 2002. Each country presents

their own sign language, as well as presenting their spoken languages. In Brazil, besides Libras, there is the Urubu-Ka’apor sign language, of the indigenous ethnic group of the same name, in Maranhão.

The deaf child communicates with the world in a visual-gestural way, that is, his experiences are totally visual and his communication is through sign language, which is developed naturally in contact with other deaf people.

“Libras is the language that deaf children fully access visually, making it their primary language. Studies indicate that literacy children in their first language perform better in literacy in a second language. Thus, it is recommended to use letter-writing in sign language followed by literacy in the Portuguese language, “says Ronice Müller de Quadros, a professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and author of the book Education for the Deaf: Language Acquisition (Artmed, 1997). According to her, Portuguese can not be a factor of exclusion of deaf people, since it is present in the various situations of everyday life, because it is the official language of the country.

Late access to sign language can compromise the development of language and, consequently, all stages of school learning. For this reason, it is advisable for a deaf child to study in a bilingual school, which is structured for the teaching of Libras as the language of instruction, and Portuguese as a second language. “The bilingual school is organized based on the Libras and appropriately to the visual experience. Already the common schools are organized based on the Portuguese language, which compromises the schooling of the deaf child “, says Ronice.

At the National Institute of Deaf Education (Ines), the Brazilian language of signs is the language of instruction, that is, all classes occur with a focus on it. The Portuguese language is taught in written form, as the second language of the students. Located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, the Ines was the first school for the deaf in the country, inaugurated in 1856 by the emperor D. Pedro II. Because it is linked to the Ministry of Education (MEC), it serves free of charge about 500 students, from Early Childhood Education (from newborns to 3 years old) to High School.

“By learning sign language, the child begins to mean the world around him. A baby with a few months already can understand and reproduce the signs of the Libras as long as stimulated for this. In this way, he can have his cognitive development appropriate to the stages of development that any child passes through. With a well-structured language, this child can learn any other language, as long as the pedagogical tools are adequate for them to achieve such learning, “says Amanda do Prado Ribeiro, director of the Basic Education Department of Ines. According to her, the team of Ines teachers is composed of deaf and hearing, who train in the course of Libras to communicate with the students.

Brazilian Border languages

Brazilian Border languages

With a land border that extends for more than 15 thousand kilometers, Brazil is limited to ten countries in South America. Despite its proximity, language is an obstacle, since Spanish is the official language of most South American countries. In order to shorten linguistic distances and promote integration between different cultures, the Intercultural Border Schools Program (Peif), an initiative of the Ministry of Education (MEC), was initiated in 2004.

Because of its strategic location, in Mato Grosso do Sul, almost on the border between Brazil and Paraguay, the João Brembatti Calvoso State School participates in Peif. Only one street separates the cities of Ponta Porã and Pedro Juan Caballero. The school serves 1,950 students from Elementary to High School. Of these, 80% live in Paraguay, where the official languages ​​are Spanish and Guarani.

At least once a week, classes are taught in Spanish and Guarani, with the exchange of Brazilian and Paraguayan teachers. School activities, which also address cultural issues such as music and dance, are conducted in all three languages.

The integration among students increased after joining Peif. “Many students have improved their income. Before, what was identified as learning difficulties in some students was proven to be ashamed to express themselves in their own language, afraid of being labeled as Paraguayan. With the project, these students began to feel valued. We have even left a trilingual dictionary available to everyone for consultation, “says director Eliana Aparecida Araújo Fernandes.

Another difference is that the school had to change its pedagogical project, currently based on research projects. At the beginning of the year, during the diagnostic evaluation, teachers consult students to find out what subjects they want to learn. Students give ideas that will be discussed and chosen by themselves. Thus, students and teachers assemble an interdisciplinary conceptual map indicating the topics of interest, defining a problem that will be addressed throughout the year, with room for adding other questions.

Language as a factor of integration

Language as a factor of integration

Brazil is the destination of many immigrants, which makes it necessary to promote public policies to integrate students into the new linguistic and cultural reality. At the Eduardo Prado State School, located in the center of the city of São Paulo, about 10% of the students are immigrants. 101 are immigrants, 71 Bolivians, 14 Paraguayans, 6 Angolans, 3 Peruvians, 2 Argentines, 2 Haitians, 2 Bangladeshi (Bangladeshi), 1 Portuguese, 1 Chinese and 1 Namibian. In addition, about 70% of Brazilian students are children of Bolivian immigrants.

As the school does not have a specific program for the teaching of the Portuguese language, the immigrant students learn from their Brazilian colleagues. “We have partnered with the Migrant Support Center (Cami), giving space for their teachers to teach Portuguese classes, but the presence of interested students is very timid. The Bolivian community, for example, is very reserved for various issues and there is prejudice on the part of Brazilian students in relation to Bolivians, especially in the second cycle of Elementary School, “says coordinator Jailson Miranda Monte.

In order to increase the integration of students and their families into the school community, in order to value their cultures and languages ​​of origin, the school promotes cultural fairs and parent meetings, but they have low adherence. However, as immigrant learners learn to speak the Portuguese language, they begin to have greater interaction with others. “I realize that many students feel a conflict between the culture they receive from their parents and the Brazilian culture, which often generates conflicts. By learning the Portuguese language, they feel more integrated and participate more in everyday school life, “says Jailson.

Portuguese language teaching for foreigners or descendants by region

Portuguese language teaching for foreigners or descendants by region

Brazilian North

Location: Pacaraima (RR)

Federal University of Roraima (UFRR): Portuguese to Foreigners of the Nucleus of Studies of Foreign Languages (Nucele).

Audience: Venezuelans and others nationalities, such as students Haiti and Africa in exchange.

Contact: +55 (95) 3621-3124

Location: Pacaraima (RR)

State University of Roraima (UERR): Portuguese to Foreigners.

Audience: Venezuelans who live in Pacaraima. And the Portuguese for Foreigners in UFRR/ NUCELE who serves Venezuelans and another nationalities as students Haiti and Africa in exchange.

Contact: +55 (95) 3592-1385

Brazilian Northeast

Location: Jaboatão dos Guararapes (PE)

MOOC Portuguese Language: happens in the platform MiríadaX, coordinated by Prof. João Mattar, Vice-President of the Association Brazilian of Educational Technology (ABT), with tutoring by Roberta Nery.

Audience: several countries, like Portugal, Wales, Colombia and Argentina.

Contactjoaomattar@gmail.com or robertanery_piscis@yahoo.com.br

Brazilian Midwest

Location: Campus Bela Vista (MT)

Federal Institute of Mato Grosso – Bela Vista Campus: Language Teaching Portuguese for foreigners.

Audience: Haitians (adults).

Organizing teacher: Cleide Ester Oliveira.

Contactcleide.oliveira@blv.ifmt.edu.br

Location: Brasilia (DF)

Portuguese course for countries, which meets several nationalities.

Contactcontato@icepebrasilia.com.br

Brazilian Southeast

Location: Sorocaba (SP)

Quilombinho Cultural Center: promotes the recovery of self-esteem of descendants of enslaved through the valorisation and diffusion of Afro-Brazilian culture.

Audience: Teaching Students Fundamental in the period out-of-school It is necessary to

to institutions formal and regular education. Age range: between 7 and 15 years, subdivided into the following groups: 7 to 9 years, 10 to 11 years, 12 to 13 years, 14 to 15 years.

Contact: +55 (15) 3018-8090 or (15) 3233-7801

Location: São Paulo (SP)

Portuguese course for Foreign Trade Support Center Immigrant (Cami).

Contactwebsite.

Location: Mario Campos (MG)

Specialized (AEE) to students deaf people aged 13 to 16 years. These students are served in the classroom of appeal. When they dominate the Libras, begin to learn the Portuguese as a second language. When they know neither Libras nor Portuguese, the two simultaneously.

Brazilian South

Location: Camboriú (SC)

IFC Camboriú: Portuguese course for Haitian immigrants residing in Camboriú, Balneário Camboriú and region. There are 30 places divided in two groups: 15 students for the class of beginners and 15 for the intermediates. Classes will be held on Tuesdays (beginners) and on Wednesdays (intermediaries) from 7 pm to 9 pm.

The course is free and part of the extension project “Inclusion by the Portuguese: Language course Portuguese for immigrants Haitians from the perspective of interculturality”.

Contactinclusaopeloportugues@ifc-camboriu.edu.br

how-to-say-thank-you-in-portuguese

Thank you in Portuguese: how to say it?

Learning how to say “Thank you” in Portuguese is essential for those interested in visiting Portugal or Brazil, or even just knowing new people from those places. But did you know that there are many ways one can say “thank you” in Portuguese? We’re gonna show you.

learn-portuguese

First of all, you need to know that ‘thank you’ in Portuguese may appear in different forms both because of the Portuguese grammar and because of its transformation through language usage and slangs. In this post we are going to try to cover all of them focusing on the main countries that speak Portuguese: Brazil and Portugal (but as always, choose the best way to learn Portuguese for your needs.

There are other places where the Portuguese Language is the official or one of the main languages in use, but if learn how to say ‘thank you’ in Portuguese with the cases we are going to present here you’re probably good to go on those other places too.

Thank you in portuguese: 10 ways to say it right

Saying ‘Thank you’ in Portuguese might get a bit tricky depending on the situation. Unlike in English, Portuguese Language varies most of its words according to the gender of the person speaking and/or receiving the message.

Below, we listed all the cases. There are audio records from native Brazilians speaking the examples used so you can understand better how they say it.

Use the summary to get the information you need faster.

Obrigado/Obrigada: Thank youValeu: Thanks
Brigado/Brigada: ThanksGrato: Grateful
Muito obrigado/Muito obrigada: Thank You Very MuchAgradecido: Thankful
Obrigadinho/Obrigadinha: ThanksNão, obrigado: No thanks
Obrigado por…: Thanks forDe nada: You’re Welcome

Obrigado/Obrigada: Thank you

Many Brazilian or Portuguese don’t know but the word ‘obrigado’ came from the Latin obligare (to be obligated, in English). And, as we said before, the word ‘obrigado’ changes when it is a woman or a man saying it and that’s extremely important on how to say ‘thank you’ in Portuguese.

Obrigado (Thank you): used by male speakers to thank for something.

Example: John wants to thank Julia for the coffee. “Obrigado pelo café, Julia!” (Thank you for the coffee, Julia).

Obrigada (Thank you): used by female speakers to thank for something.

Example: Susan wants to thank Carlos for the help. “Obrigada pela ajuda, Carlos!” (Thank you for your help, Carlos).

Obrigado/Obrigada has another meaning

Be careful: Obrigado/Obrigada also has the meaning of literally ‘obliged’. How do you know then? Pay attention on the context the speaker is using it. It rarely will be used on light conversations or when the mood is cheerful. Examples of ‘obrigado’ used as ‘obliged’:

  • “Ela foi obrigada a ficar até mais tarde no trabalho para terminar suas tarefas” – She was obliged to stay late at work to finish her tasks;
  • “Todos os motoristas estão obrigados por lei a realizarem o teste do bafômetro” – All drivers are obliged by law to perform the breathalyzer test.

Brigado/Brigada: Thanks

Both Brazilians and Portuguese are used to ‘chop’ the ‘o’ from Obrigado. This is the result of many centuries of Portuguese usage and is mostly likely that this change was intended to make easier (and faster) to say obrigado.

Although is common to hear ‘brigado’ to say thank you in Portuguese, please note that this is a feature from the spoken language only. There is no ‘brigado’ in written form when used to thank for something (more on that later).

The usage goes as the traditional ‘obrigado’ as we saw above, but it only can be used on informal occasions:

Brigado (thanks): used by a male speaker on informal occasions.

Example: Mark wants to thank the driver for the ride. “Brigado pela carona” (Thanks for the ride).

Brigada (thanks): used by a female speaker on informal occasions.

Example: Beth wants to thank Rita for the Pão de Queijo recipe. “Brigada pela receita, Rita. Estava deliciosa!” (Thanks for the recipe, Rita. It was delicious!)

Brigado/Brigada has another meaning

Yeap, as it happens with ‘obrigado/obrigada’, ‘brigado/brigada’ also has another meaning. It mean something like ‘fought’, so be careful whiling using it. Some examples of ‘brigado/brigada’ meaning ‘fought/fight’:

  • “Mariana estava brigada com a irmã dela há 3 anos, mas hoje fizeram as pazes” – Mariana had a fight with her sister 3 years ago and they weren’t speaking to each other since then, but today they made peace with each other again.
  • “Pedro havia brigado na rua” – Pedro had a fight out on the street.

Muito obrigado/Muito obrigada: Thank You Very Much

What happens when you are REALLY thankful for something? Well, there’s a way to say it in Portuguese too. This case is simple and it doesn’t have any other meaning so you can use to express your gratitude with no worries.

Muito obrigado (thank you very much): used by a male speaker who wants to show gratitude over something.

Example: Jonathan wants to thank Marcos for have helped with the visa, otherwise he would have to return to his country. “Muito obrigado pela ajuda com o Visto, Marcos! Se não fosse por você eu estaria em grandes apuros.” (Thank you very much for your help with my visa, Marcos! Without your help I would be in big trouble right now).

Muito obrigada (thank you very much): used by a female speaker who wants to show gratitude over something.

Example: Serena wants to thank Felipe for the ride to the airport when she wasn’t able to find any taxis and was going to miss the flight. “Muito obrigada pela carona, Felipe. Você salvou a minha vida!” (Thank you very much for the ride, Felipe. You saved my life!)

Obrigadinho/Obrigadinha: Thanks

Both ‘obrigadinho’ and ‘obrigadinha’ have no direct translation to English. They are just a cute way to say thank you in Portuguese or to show affection. It’s mostly used by women and among girl conversation.

Obrigadinho (thanks): used by a male speaker to say thank you in a cute manner (but is very unlike that you have to use this form).

Obrigadinha (thanks): used by a female speaker to say thank you in a cute manner.

Example: Mary wants to thank Carla for the cute message she sent her before she left for work. “Recebi seu recadinho, você é tão fofa! Obrigadinha!” (I received your message, you so cute! Thanks!)

Obrigado por/pelo…: Thanks for/Thank you for

As in English, we often thank someone for something in Portuguese. So you might have to use ‘por’ or “pelo/pela” in addition to ‘obrigado’. The direct translation is something like ‘thanks for’ and it is used in most of the cases.

Obrigado por (thank you for/thanks for): used by a male speaker to thank someone for something.

Example: Joseph wants to thank Camila for the gift. “Obrigado pelo presente!” (Thank you for the present).

Obrigada por (thank you for/thanks for): used by a female speaker to thank someone for something.

Example: Carol wants to thank Oswaldo for waiting her at the office. “Obrigada por me esperar, Oswaldo! Acabei me atrasando no trabalho.” (Thanks for waiting, Oswaldo! I was late because of work).

Valeu: Thanks

We can say that ‘valeu’ is the direct equivalent to ‘thanks’ in English and it’s an informal way to say thank you in Portuguese. As other words presented here so far, ‘valeu’ also has another meaning so pay attention to that.

Valeu (thanks): used both by male and female speakers do thank for something in a very informal way.

Example: Carry wants to thank her classmate for the tips about next week’s exam. “Valeu pela dica, vai me ajudar bastante na prova.” (Thanks for the tip, it’s going to be really helpful in my exam).

The other meanings of ‘Valeu’

The word ‘valeu’ is derived from the word ‘vale’ and it has other usages. For instance, ‘valeu a pena’ means ‘worth it’ and ‘quanto vale?’ might mean ‘how much it costs?’.

Grato: Grateful

If you are really grateful for something, you can use ‘grato/grata’. Grato means grateful and can also be used as a really forma way to say thank you in Portuguese. Let’s see:

Grato (grateful): used by a male speaker to express gratitude.

Example: “Sou muito grato por tê-la conhecido.” (I’m very grateful for meeting you).

Grata (grateful): used by a female speaker to express gratitude.

Example: “Sou muito grata pela chance que tive de participar de um intercâmbio” (I’m very grateful for having the chance of participating on an exchange program).

Grato/Grata (grateful-ish): used by male/female to say thank you in Portuguese in a formal manner (very common on emails, signs, memos at the office, etc.).

Example: A sign at a hospital asking to be silent. “Por favor, faça silêncio. Grato pela compreensão.” (Please remain silent. We appreciate your cooperation)

Agradecido: Thankful

The word ‘agradecido/agradecida’ literally means grateful in Portuguese and must be used in really formal conversations and/or texts.

Agradecido (thankful): used by a male speaker to express gratefulness.

Example: “Estou muito agradecido pelo convite, senhor presidente.” (I’m really grateful for your invitation, mr. President).

Agradecida (thankful): used by a female speaker to express gratefulness.

Example: “Fiquei muito agradecida com a homenagem que recebi da universidade.” (I was very grateful for the homage I received at the University).

Não, obrigado: No thanks

Portuguese speakers also thank when refusing something. It’s quite simple actually:

Não, obrigado: used both by male and female speakers to politely refuse something.

Example: Brad had dinner before he went to Carina’s house. But there they were about to eat diner, so he refuses because is not hungry. “Não, obrigado. Já jantei em casa.” (No thanks, I already had dinner at home).

De nada: You are welcome

As we do in English, Portuguese speakers have a way to kind of respond when someone says thank you in Portuguese. As you are going to see, the direct translation of the expression has no meaning in English, so the best equivalent in our language would be ‘You’re welcome’.

De nada: used both male and female speakers to acknowledge when someone says thank you in Portuguese.

Example: Ted drove Cristina to the dock. When Cristina says “Obrigado pela carona” (Thanks for the ride), Ted answers “De nada, Cristina” (You’re welcome Cristina).

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese

how-to-say-yes-in-portuguese

How to say Yes in Portuguese

Saying Yes in Portuguese is very important. After all, how could you try the delicious Portuguese and Brazilian foods your friends are offering you if you can’t say Yes in Portuguese?

Luckly, saying Yes in Portuguese is quite simple and it works for every country that has Portuguese as its official language (but you’ve got to find the best way to learn Portuguese that fit your needs). Wanna learn how to say Yes in Portuguese? Let’s go!

How to say Yes in Portuguese

Unlike it happens with thank you in Portuguese, saying yes doesn’t require attention to the context the word is been used in. So when someone offers you Pão de Queijo you can say Yes in Portuguese without a worry.

Sim mean Yes

The way to say Yes in Portuguese is to use the word ‘sim’. ‘Sim” literally means yes and can be used by any speaker (male or female) because it doesn’t change. Let’s see some examples:

Sim, a língua falada no Brasil é o Português. Porém, existem também diversas línguas indígenas em uso. – Yes, the language spoken in Brazil is Portuguese. However, there are a variety of indigenous languages also been spoken.

Gostaria de um cafézinho? / Sim, gostaria! – Would you like some coffee? / Yes, sure!

Saying Yes in Portuguese without using ‘sim’

Although sayin Yes in Portuguese is just using the word ‘sim’, there are other ways to say yes (or simply agree) in Portuguese without the word ‘sim’. It’s very common in Brazil people agree ou say yes using the same verb they had been asked with. Here some examples:

Você vai à escola? / Eu vou. – Do you go to school? Yes I do.

Comprou as passagens? / Comprei. – Did you buy the tickets? Yes I did.

Você sabe qual é a capital do Brasil? / Eu sei, é Brasília. – Do you know what is the Capital of Brazil? / Yes I do, it’s Brasília.

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say Happy Birthday in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
how-to-say-merry-christmas-in-portuguese

How to say Merry Christmas in Portuguese

Are you going to spend the Christmas in Brazil or Portugal? Are you just interested in learning how to say Merry Christmas in Portuguese so you can show appreciation for your Brazilian and/or Portuguese friends? Well, here you are going to learn!

learn-portuguese

Christmas is a global celebrations and Brazil and Portugal are not exceptions. These countries are mostly catholic so the celebration of Christmas is quite serious there. Online content is the best way for you to learn Portuguese? Then let’s find out how to say it!

How to say Merry Christmas in Portuguese

Saying Merry Christmas in Portuguese is really simple and is also an expression made by two words, so is easy to correlate with the way we say it in English. Let’s see:

Feliz Natal means Merry Christmas

Feliz Natal is the word used in Portuguese to say Merry Christmas. Its usage is quite simple and it doesn’t vary in number or in gender:

Feliz Natal para você e toda a sua família (Merry Christmas for you and your family).

O presidente Lula desejou um feliz natal a todos os brasileiros (The president Lula wished a merry christmas to the Brazilian people).

Feliz Natal can be written both with or without capital letters.

You can also hear Boas Festas

If you travelling or chatting with Brazilians and Portuguese during christmas you might notice that some of them can say ‘boas festas’. 

Although it can be used to wish a merry christmas, ‘boas festas’ means something like ‘happy holidays’ and is commonly used to wish people both a merry christmas and a happy new year when you are no going to see them during this time.

Já que estarei viajando durante dezembro e janeiro, desejo a você boas festas! (As I will be traveling and might not see you during december and january, happy holidays!).

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
how-to-say-no-in-portuguese

How to say No in Portuguese

Learn how to say no in Portuguese is as important as learning how to say yes, especially if you traveling to Brazil or Portugal and want to avoid accepting suspicious food or tourists baits.

learn-portuguese

Also think that the best way to learn Portuguese is online and for free? So you going to love our website!

How to say No in Portuguese

Saying no in Portuguese is quite simple and the words are somewhat similar both in English and Portuguese. However, the pronunciation might be tricky so pay attention to the audios to learn how to say no in Portuguese correctly.

Não means No in Portuguese

The word ‘não’ means ‘no’ (told you they were similar). However, there is a symbol in this word that you might not know and that is used a nightmare for English speakers to pronounce correctly.

The sign above the letter ‘a’ means that that vocal is a ‘nasal’ sound and require to be said differently. Let’s see:

Não vamos ao parque hoje (Today we are not going to the park).

Você não me conhece (You don’t know me).

Não corra no piso molhado (Don’t run on the wet floor).

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
how-to-say-congratulations-in-portuguese

How to say Congratulations in Portuguese

Looking for ways to congratulate you Portuguese or Brazilian colleagues but are not sure how? Let’s find out how to say Congratulations in Portuguese!

Also think that the best way to learn Portuguese is online and for free? So you going to love our website!

How to say Congratulations in Portuguese

There are many ways one can say Congratulations in Portuguese. Here we are going to show you the main words used to do so and when to use them. Let’s see:

Parabéns means Congratulations in Portuguese

As it happens with many words in Portuguese, ‘parabéns’ also can be used on other contexts. But it also mean congratulations. This is the word more commonly used to congratulate someone.

Parabéns pela promoção! Você merece! (Congratulations on your promotion! You deserve it!)

Parabéns pelo livro, é muito interessante e bem escrito (Congratulations on your book. It’s really interesting and well-written).

Congratulações also means Congratulations in Portuguese

The word ‘congratulações’ directly translates to ‘congratulations’ in English. But is rarely used on conversations and it’s reserved for documents or extremely formal speeches.

Damos as congratulações ao senhor ministro pela aprovação dessa medida tão importante para o povo (We congratulate the minister for approving such an important bill for the people).

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
how-to-say-kisses-in-portuguese

How to say Kisses in Portuguese

Interested in starting a new romance with an Brazilian or Portuguese and want to learn how to say Kisses in Portuguese? Well, let’s find out!

learn-portuguese

Also think that the best way to learn Portuguese is online and for free? So you’re going to love our website!

How to say Kisses in Portuguese

There is just one way of saying kisses in Portuguese. Of course, it might change a bit when using kiss as a verb, but it’s usage its very straightforward.

Beijos means Kisses in Portuguese

Let’s see some examples of ‘beijos’ being used as kisses in Portuguese:

Seus beijos são muito bons! (Your kisses are so good!).

Não consigo esquecer os seus beijos… (Can’t take your kisses out of my mind…).

No Rio de Janeiro é comum as pessoas se cumprimentarem com dois beijos no rosto (In Rio de Janeiro is common to salutate a friend with two kisses on the cheek).

Beijar as the verb To Kiss in Portuguese

When using the verb to kiss in Portuguese (beijar), is important to know that the word will vary according to the verb tense.

Quero muito te beijar! (I want to kiss you so bad!).

Ontem eu beijei a Cláudia. (Yesterday I gave Cláudia a kiss).

Se eu pudesse, a beijaria todos os dias… (I would kiss her everyday if I could…).

Learn more expressions in Portuguese!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
brazilian-movies

Hundreds of Brazilian Films and Series to watch for free | Learn Portuguese

SPCine, a Brazilian film platform recently released its entire catalog of Brazilin films and series to watch completely for free.

The website has movies for free on its own platform and even in Looke (all completely free). Having this catalog available for free might be one of the best ways to learn Portuguese at home and practice your language skills.

More about the SPCine Play

learn-portuguese

Spcine Play is the only public streaming platform in Brazil. The curatorship shows films from the main exhibitions and film festivals in São Paulo, an unprecedented action among services of the genre. The content is accessible simultaneously to the events and remains available on the platform.

Spcine Play also displays exclusive content from the cultural program of the city of São Paulo. There are concerts, shows and performances to watch without leaving home. There, you can still find rarities of classic Brazilian filmmakers, such as Hector Babenco, Zé do Caixão and Suzana Amaral. The service is available for all of Brazil through the website.

Even content for kids is available, wich is a good chance for the beginners to learn.

Learn Portuguese for free with us!

Learned how to say thank you in Portuguese? What about learn more expressions to improve your portuguese?

How to say thank you in portugueseHow to say grandma in portuguese
How to say happy birthday in portugueseHow to say cheers in portuguese
How to say yes in portugueseHow to say bye in portuguese
How to say hi in portugueseHow to say friend in portuguese
How to say goodbye in portugueseHow to say dog in portuguese
How to say merry christmas in portugueseHow to say sorry in portuguese
How to say you’re welcome in portugueseHow to say the months in portuguese
How to say beautiful in portugueseHow to say my lover in portuguese
How to say welcome in portugueseHow to say grandmother in portuguese
How to say no in portugueseHow to say my love in portuguese
How to say congratulations in portugueseHow to say good luck in portuguese
How to say kisses in portugueseHow to say pineapple in portuguese
How to say the days of the week in portugueseHow to say queen in portuguese
How to say happy new year in portuguese
which-european-nation-was-the-most-influential-in-colonizing-brazil

Which European Nation Was The Most influential in Colonizing Brazil? – Answers here

The colonization process in Brazil was a consequence of the already developed process of maritime expansion carried out by the Portuguese. During the 15th century, the Portuguese occupied strategic regions in Asia and Africa that could be used as a focus for commercial expansion. Subsequently, the control of these areas had opened space for the first colonizing practices to be undertaken in the Azores and Madeira Islands.

The conquest of trade routes with the East, which until then had been the main area of ​​commercial flow for European nations, made the discovery of Brazilian lands not of much interest to the Crown. In the first thirty years of colonization, the only activities were limited to extracting the brazilwood in the coastal regions of the country. This enterprise had the collaboration of the Indians, who in exchange for some products and utensils, felled and stored the wood.

However, the repudiation of some nations against the Iberian monopoly on the exploitation of American lands would transform this situation. Nations like France and the Netherlands demanded the adoption of the principle of uti possidetis so that the colonial territories were properly demarcated. At the same time that they protested, these nations threatened the Portuguese hegemony in Brazilian lands by sending expeditions to recognize the Brazilian territory.

Portugal Was The Most influential European Nation in Colonizing Brazil

Such threats caused the Portuguese colonial policy to be modified. In 1530, the expeditionary Martim Afonso de Sousa founded the first colonial exploration center on the coast of the current State of São Paulo. This first occupation gave rise to the Vila de São Vicente, which, later on, would have the company of other occupation centers located in the Planalto de Piratininga region. Many of the first inhabitants were exiled and deserters who were marginalized on the Old Continent.

From then on, the colonial administration had a first distribution system organized through the division of the territory. This division gave rise to the so-called hereditary captaincies, large tracts of land that were donated to nobles, bureaucrats or influential traders within the Portuguese Court. Whoever received some captaincy was called a donor and would have to comply with the principles established by two legal documents: the Letter of Donation and the Charter.

Landing of Cabral in Porto Seguro (oil on canvas), author: Oscar Pereira da Silva, 1904. Collection of the National Historical Museum, Rio de Janeiro.
Landing of Cabral in Porto Seguro (oil on canvas). Author: Oscar Pereira da Silva, 1904. Collection of the National Historical Museum, Rio de Janeiro.

This first system of control and settlement of the Brazilian colony ended up not having great results. With this, the Portuguese decided to implant a new administrative system more centralized and composed of direct representatives of the metropolitan power. It was from there that the so-called government-general arose, a governor appointed by the king should take measures in favor of the creation of villages, the economic exploitation of the lands and the fight against pirates and smugglers.

To handle so many functions, the governor-general had the support of a staff of officials. To deal with questions of justice, there was the figure of the Chief Ombudsman; the financial resources raised by colonial activity and the collection of taxes was the responsibility of the chief provider; and the captain-general fought off invaders and criminals in the colonial environment. The first city chosen to house the general government was Salvador, considered the first capital of Brazil.

Route followed by Cabral intended to go to India but that ultimately led to the discovery of Brazil in 1500 (in red) and the return route (in blue).
Route followed by Cabral intended to go to India but that ultimately led to the discovery of Brazil in 1500 (in red) and the return route (in blue).

In addition to having the Crown’s interest, colonization also developed thanks to the action of the missionaries of the Order of Jesus. The Jesuit priests came to Brazil in order to catechize the native populations and, through their action, ended up giving a religious justification to the presence of the Portuguese in distant lands. The spread of Christianity ended up supporting all exploitation and expropriation practiced at that time.

In this way, one of the longest periods in Brazilian history began. Over the course of four centuries, the Portuguese have undertaken profitable businesses at the expense of a centralized administrative structure geared to the exclusive interests of the metropolis. Many of the social, political, economic and cultural features assumed by Brazil today are the result of this long historical period.

The Juan de la Cosa map, a world map dated from 1500, is the oldest nautical chart on which Brazil is represented.
The Juan de la Cosa map, a world map dated from 1500, is the oldest nautical chart on which Brazil is represented.